When will I get my deposit back?

After the check out has been completed on the last day of your tenancy, we aim to have a breakdown of any deductions to you within one month. Once this has been agreed, your deposit will be returned within 48 hours to your nominated bank account. We know you probably have a lot more questions, click here to find out more about how the deposit return process works.

What happens on the day I move out?

Set your alarm folks and dig out the rubber gloves! Our independent inventory company will come to your property any time from 7am on the last day of your tenancy to conduct a check-out. Please make sure the property is returned to the same condition as the inventory and completely clean and clear of all personal belongings or rubbish, including outside areas, by 7am. No matter how useful you might think an item will be for the next tenant, it’s important to not leave it, otherwise you may be charged for its removal. We recommend moving out the day before to avoid any last minute stress!

What is the check-out report?

The check out report is a condition report compiled by a third party inventory company, who will use the original inventory document to independently assess if the property has been handed back to its original condition, taking into consideration fair wear and tear. The inventory company are a professional, independent company employed to provide an unbiased report of condition. These reports are very detailed and will not list anything that is considered to be fair wear and tear. Any items listed as tenant charges are areas the inventory clerk has identified as in need of cleaning, gardening or as damage that is in excess of fair wear and tear. Any items that were in a room on the original inventory that are not in the room at checkout, will be listed as missing items even if they have been moved to another room.

Is there a fair wear and tear allowance on cleaning?

You are expected to return the property and its contents in a clean and good state of repair – as it was at the start of the tenancy. Fair wear and tear only relates to damage, not gardening or cleanliness.

How are the gardening costs calculated?

You are required to return the garden back to your landlord in the same condition that it was given to you. There is no wear and tear allowance on gardening, therefore, if there are any differences from your inventory at check-out, they will unfortunately be noted as dilapidations by the inventory company and you could be charged. The amount that you are charged depends on the size of the garden, the extent of the difference from your inventory and how much work is involved to return it to its original state. For example, small patios with a couple of flower beds will take the gardener a lot less time to do than a large garden with a lawn and hedge borders. Similarly, if a garden has been cut back to some extent, but some parts missed, this will not take as long to sort out than if the garden has been left to completely overgrow for several months. The gardener factors all of this in when invoicing for the job as well as costs involved in any green waste removal needed. Gardening charges can therefore vary considerably from around £40 up to £300+.

What are apportionment charges and what does betterment mean?

Sometimes it is not necessary to replace whole items when damage has been caused, particularly if the damage is aesthetic and does not impact on its functionality. For example, if a carpet has an iron burn mark, this has affected how the carpet looks but has not had too much impact on its function as a carpet for the immediate future. Apportionment charges are usually taken when items are not needed to be replaced, the money taken is to compensate the landlord for the loss of value and to go towards eventual replacement when needed. Therefore, apportionment charges should be a portion of the cost of replacement which is dependent on the severity of damage, original condition, life expectancy and type of tenant. To charge the whole amount of replacing the item would be betterment for the landlord as they would be receiving something brand new that was not necessarily new in the first place. In the above example, it would be deemed unfair if a landlord changed the whole carpet because of this burn mark, therefore, to avoid betterment, the landlord would take an apportionment charge for the aesthetic damage that has been caused.

Dependent on the damage, there may be some instances where you could also be charged for the most economical cost of any necessary remedial works. For example, if the marks to the carpet were particularly bad in one area and they could not be covered easily with furniture, the landlord would be entitled to charge not only for the aesthetic damage caused to the carpet but they could also include the cost of a rug to cover the marks. This would be deemed a fair charge as the landlord is not enjoying any betterment from this situation – they would be in a similar situation as before.

How are these charges calculated and the tenant and landlord contributions worked out?

Charges for any missing or broken items of furniture are assessed fairly on a case-by-case basis and there are many factors to take into consideration. We will be looking at the following items initially:

  • Whether the item can be repaired or whether it must be replaced
  • How old the item is, and the original quality of the item
  • The reasonable expected usage of the item
  • What the cost of a replacement item would be
  • The length of the tenancy

We would then calculate the apportionment for each item. For example, a item of furniture costing £90 with an expected lifespan of 4 years, which was new at the beginning of a 1 year tenancy has been broken and needs replacing. The item still has a further 3 years life expectancy and the landlord has only had 1 years use of the item. We would therefore calculate £90 divided by 4 years equals £22.50 per year, so the tenants would be charged £67.50 (3 years) and the landlord would pay the remaining £22.50 (1 year).

If the same item of furniture was 2 years old at the start of a 2 year tenancy, the item has reached its life expectancy of 4 years and would be replaced at the landlords cost.

If the item has been broken and the landlord decides they would like to replace it with a more expensive option, the tenant would still only be charged as though the item had been replaced with a ‘like for like’ replacement costing £90, with the landlord covering the additional cost of increased quality.

I have been charged for a missing item but I am sure it was left in the property, maybe in a different room or a cupboard?

The check-out clerk will thoroughly check the property and list any items that appear in different rooms compared to the inventory. A staff member from Coapt will also visit the property the day after you vacate, as well as the day before the next set of tenants are due to move in, and will ensure that you are not charged for items that are recovered.

Why have I been charged £18 for a missing key? It only costs £4 to get a key cut!

The £18 cost is listed in your contract and is the cost of having the key cut, as well as the time it takes from an agent’s day to undertake all that is involved in the keys replacement.. Once the agent has made the trip from the Coapt office to the key cutting shop to have the key cut, they will then need to travel to the property, test the key and leave the new copy for the incoming tenants check-in. Please note that as Coapt are a VAT registered company, the actual charge is £15 (+ VAT).

I do not understand why I am being charged for this invoice?

During your tenancy, you are responsible for carrying out all works of repair that are not the responsibility of the Landlord and taking appropriate care of the property. This includes the replacement of disposable items such as fuses, batteries and lightbulbs and acting as a guardian of the property throughout the tenancy. Tenant invoices often result from an unnecessary call out to the property which the contractor then invoices for wasted time. i.e. if a tenant reports their oven is not working and it turns out one of the tenants has unplugged it at the wall. Or if a sink or toilet is blocked due to excessive food waste or sanitary items blocking it as a result of the tenant’s actions.

If you do not pay these invoices during your tenancy, they will unfortunately be deducted from your deposit so that the contractor is paid for their time. You can contact us and we can help explain why any invoices have been raised and help you avoid any further charges in the future.

My housemate did not pay their last month’s rent, is this now allowed to come out of our joint deposit?

We do make every effort to chase tenants for any overdue rent, as well as calling guarantors where applicable. If the tenant continues to ignore our requests and does not pay the rent after they have vacated the property, we will be left with no choice but to deduct the rent from the deposit. Please note that if the rent, along with any other deposit deductions exceeds the deposit amount, we will request any outstanding amount from all tenants.

My parents want to speak to you about the deposit deductions on my behalf, can they call in?

We are only able to discuss the breakdown with tenants named on the agreement. Please do speak amongst yourselves as tenants and feel free to drop us a call or email and we will be happy to liaise with you directly.

Do I need to be there?

No, you do not need to be at the property for your check-out. If you are present you will be asked to wait outside while our independent inventory company compiles the report. This is for two reasons; firstly because they want to be able to complete the report independently without distraction and need peace and quiet in order to record it, and secondly to make sure there is no bias affecting the report. The same rules apply to your landlord, so we feel like it’s pretty fair.

Do the inventory company take into account fair wear and tear at the check-out?

Fair wear and tear is taken into account by the third party inventory company. They have undertaken thorough training to be able to decide what is fair wear and tear. It is dependent on many factors, for example the length of the tenancy, the type of tenancy and where in the property the affected area is. For example, if the tenancy was over 6 years it is expected that there will be more marks to walls than a tenancy of 6 months. The walls on a staircase or hallway are likely to become slightly marked as opposed to walls to a bedroom, due to heavier traffic.

There are items that will never be considered fair wear and tear. For example, but not limited to: Dirt and dust, burn marks or staining on floors and carpets, lost keys, broken windows, burnt on food to ovens / grills, grease build up on walls, hair, limescale, water marks, heavy scratching, pet hair / damage, avoidable damage to an item or area, staining to mattresses, allowing water damage to a property, misuse or abuse of an item, replacing an item with a similar one, but of poor quality,excessive usage causing damage, broken items disposed of, impact marks and blu tac.

Do I need to contact Coapt once I have moved out to request my deposit back?

You don’t need to contact us about your deposit – we have a process in place to ensure we contact everyone after they have moved out. Once you have moved out we will send you an email confirming what happens next. If there are any deductions from your deposit these will be broken down clearly for you and sent to you, along with a copy of the check out report, within one month of your check out date. As you can imagine, we have a lot of student tenants that move out at a similar time. We work through them in order of each property moving out and will send them across as quickly as possible.

I have read my check-out report and the Inventory company have highlighted some dilapidations that I forgot to do, can I go back in the house after the check-out so that I can sort them out and avoid deposit deductions?

Once you have left the property and your check-out has been completed, you are not able to re-enter the property to carry out any cleaning etc. We will give you lots of notice and information in the months and weeks leading up to your check out, so you will know exactly what you need to do and when, before moving out.. Unfortunately, due to the tight schedules in turning the property around for the new tenancy, we are unable to allow permission for you to go back to the property. We use tried and tested contractors to remedy any missed areas/items.

I have just realised that I have left some items at the property that I would like back, what do I do?

Please do contact us and let us know if there is anything you have left in the property that you need back. There is a very short period of time where items can be returned and we will try our best to keep anything for you. However we would recommend that you double check every room, cupboard etc. before you leave. It’s important that all of your belongings have been removed as we are unable to guarantee they can be returned to you after works have begun or the new tenants have moved in.

Will we get charged for everything that is listed in the check-out report?

Not necessarily. As the report is conducted by a third party company, they will not have been involved in your tenancy and therefore will not be aware of certain changes. For example, they may list a blind as missing, however this could have been removed by the landlord mid-tenancy. Or they may list a washing machine as having been changed by the tenants, but this could have been replaced by the landlord mid-tenancy as the machine had broken. It is then our job to go through each check-out report and address these issues on a case- by- case basis and work out what has been legitimately changed and what has not. We will also look out for any items listed as missing that have actually been moved to other rooms. Please do not panic if there are lots of items that are listed that you feel you are not responsible for, we will look at these and work out if any of it is your responsibility. We do keep a log of changes like this on our management system (as long as we’ve been notified of them throughout your tenancy), so whilst it’s often a time-consuming tasks it’s usually very straightforward for us to work out what’s what.

I have received my check-out report and do not agree with what it says, what is the next step?

Hold fire! Please refer to the breakdown of your deductions. There may be things on the check-out report that have changed during your tenancy that the independent inventory company were not aware of. We work hard to go through each individual check-out report to ensure that you aren’t charged for things that have legitimately changed during your tenancy. We use your original inventory report for comparison when we go back to check the property. If you are unhappy with the breakdown of deductions, please click here

I am not the lead tenant, and this person is not around at the moment, can I be the spokesperson for the house regarding the deposit return?

Yes, of course. We only require one spokesperson for each property. It is best if you nominate a person and all speak together before coming back to us with any points you do not agree with in one go. It does not need to be the lead tenant that is nominated for this.

The check-out report states that there is an item missing but I know it is in the house, just in a different room.

We do ask that all items are returned to the rooms they were in at the start of the tenancy to avoid any confusion on the check-out report. We will look at the check-out report when we visit the property to work out if any of the missing items have been left in a different room. Please note any large items (e.g. wardrobes etc.) that have been moved MUST be returned to the correct rooms as we may have to charge for a contractor to move these if they are too large for us to move (if it took four of you, it’s probably going to take that many of us!).

It has been over 1 month since I moved out and I still haven’t heard anything about my deposit return, do I need to call the office?

We work really hard to get your deposit breakdown across to you within 1 month of your check-out as we know how important that money is in taking your next steps – whether you’re moving into a new place, paying of bills or treating yourself. We process returns in order of move out dates, so please do bear with us as it is an incredibly busy time of year. It helps us to process everyone’s breakdowns more quickly if we can focus on these, so please avoid contacting us within this period. If you have not heard from us within this timeframe, please email finance@coapt.co.uk and we will let you know when you will receive your breakdown.

Will we be told exactly what the deductions are from the deposit and will Coapt tell us who should pay for what?

We will provide a detailed breakdown of any deductions from your deposit on a room-by-room basis so you can easily negotiate any discrepancies with your housemates. There will be separate sections for items such as keys, unpaid admin fees etc. Each room will also be itemised and there will be a cost per item listed. As the deposit is treated as a whole (due to a joint and severally liable tenancy agreement) this will help you to divide up who is responsible for each deduction, if at all.

The number of hours cleaning needed is higher than I expected, how has this been worked out?

During your check-out, the independent, accredited clerk will create a guide of the amount of cleaning that is required in each room based on their professional opinion; this is in direct comparison to the cleanliness at the beginning of your tenancy. This information is sent to the cleaning company prior to them attending the property to give them an idea of how much cleaning is required.

Cleaning at £20 per hour seems expensive, I have found a cleaner that charges less per hour, why didn’t you use them instead?

Before you leave the property, we send through several reminders to clean the property and provide you with information on how to do so. You are welcome to have the clean carried out before the last date of your tenancy by a cleaner of your choice (Checkatrade is a great place to look for someone), which you would need to organise yourselves. Unfortunately, due to the sheer volume of work that comes with cleaning around 500 houses in a 12-week window, the cleaning firms that we use have a number of experienced end-of-tenancy cleaners, office staff, cleaning supervisors, company vehicles, etc. meaning larger overheads than a much smaller cleaning firm. Therefore their £20ph hourly rate is higher than some smaller firms. They also have additional fixed costs for oven cleaning, freezer defrosts, rubbish removal, carpet and mattress cleaning.

Why is there a separate charge for the oven clean/freezer defrost?

The £20 hourly rate is for general cleaning which only requires regular cleaning products (i.e bleach/antibacterial spray/vacuuming), not specialist chemicals/equipment. As specific chemicals must be used to clean an oven or defrost a freezer as well as the additional time this takes, the cost of this will be in excess of £20 and you will therefore be charged separately. To avoid this, we recommend you do a deep clean before you leave the property (there are some excellent, if slightly cheesy videos on how to do this on YouTube like this one).

The carpets were already a bit dirty when we moved in, why have we been charged for carpet cleaning?

The cleanliness of the carpets are compared to the state they were in when you moved into the property. If the carpets were clean when you moved in but they are dirty when you vacate, you will be charged for the cleaning. In some cases, if carpets were showing stains when you moved in and then were in a worse state when you vacate, the cost of cleaning can be split between Landlord and Tenant. Again, carpet and mattress cleaning requires a large cleaning machine to be brought into the property. This is why carpet cleaning is charged separately, with a set up charge for the initial area cleaned.

Why doesn’t mattress cleaning come under the general cleaning hours?

The £20 hourly rate is for a general clean that does not require specialist chemicals/equipment. Mattress sanitising is very time consuming and requires specialist equipment. This does not constitute general cleaning and you will therefore be charged separately. Sometimes accidents happen, and if you know that your mattress needs a clean and would like to organise one yourself, then we’d recommend finding a supplier on Checkatrade.

We left our rubbish outside for the refuse collectors, why have we been charged for rubbish removal?

In accordance with your tenancy agreement, you are responsible for keeping the property clear from rubbish and ensuring that it is regularly collected by the local authority. If there is an excessive amount of rubbish (more than 1 wheelie bin load), the council will not remove it. If you do not remove it at the end of your tenancy, we will be required to hire a rubbish removal company to ensure the property is clear of rubbish for the incoming tenants. If you think you have the wrong bin size, you can also request a new one from the Council during your tenancy – just follow this link.

The rubbish removal charge seems expensive considering we didn’t leave that much, how come?

It completely depends how much you’ve left. If the amount left is more than one van load, you will be charged for the use of another van. Rubbish removal contractors also have to take waste to a trade waste site which is time consuming and often incurs charges. It is much more cost effective for you to take it to a non-commercial tip.

We just left a few items in the house for the new tenants, why have we been charged for their removal?

We do ask that all personal items are removed from the property prior to your check-out, no matter how useful you think they might be for the next tenants.This is so we can keep the standards of our properties the same across the board.

Can we see a copy of the cleaning invoice?

Of course! Please let us know if you would like copies of any invoices for works carried out – just email finance@coapt.co.uk.

We did cut back our garden before we moved out but didn’t manage to remove the green waste, is this correct that we should pay for this now and why is it so much?

Part of the clearance of your garden prior to your check-out should include removing all green waste. Large piles of this left in gardens attracts vermin and can take a long time to break down naturally. New tenants will be moving into the property shortly after you vacate, therefore, the garden needs to be cleared and ready for them to use. If we need to get our gardener to remove any green waste once you have checked out, then unfortunately there will be a charge for this. Our gardener charges for their time to remove this as well as the cost of disposing of it at a commercial green waste disposal site. The amount you could be charged depends on the amount of waste left; the larger the amount, the longer it will take our gardeners to load it onto their truck for removal and the more they will be charged for disposal.

How are the landlord and tenant contributions worked out for repainting and why have we been charged different amounts for different walls?

If the check-out report states that marks have been caused to walls in the property that are in excess of normal wear and tear, the landlord is entitled to receive some compensation for this damage. Dependent on the extent of the damage, the landlord may decide to instruct a contractor to repaint the wall/s (although this is not necessary in order to make a charge from the deposit for any marks caused).

Our contractors charge £54 to repaint each wall. We instruct contractors to repaint whole walls rather than touch in marks as this often leaves obvious patches of new paint and can look much worse than the original damage. The apportionment of this cost between landlord and tenant is worked out based on the theory that a landlord is expected to repaint their property on average every 4 years. Therefore, over 4 years, the wall would depreciate at £13.50 per year (£54 being the cost of repainting divided by the number of years it could be expected to last).

If the check-out report states that a wall has been marked during your tenancy, it is our job to then look at your original inventory and investigate when that wall was last repainted. We can then work out how much should be apportioned to the tenants and to the landlord. For example, if the inventory states that the wall at the beginning of the tenancy was in a ‘good clean condition,’ or ‘appears freshly painted,’ and that same wall is then marked at the end of the tenancy and in need of repainting, the landlord has only had 1 year’s worth of ‘use’ out of the wall. In this instance, the landlord should pay £13.50 for that year and the tenant would be responsible for the 3 years that the landlord missed out on due to the damage caused, so the tenant would be charged £40.50. In another scenario, the inventory could list the walls as having some marks present at the start of the tenancy and then the check-out report shows that there are additional marks to these at check-out. If we find that this wall was repainted two years prior to the check-out, the cost of the repainting would be split 50/50 between the landlord and tenant.

Consequently, different walls in the same property may have been repainted at different points in time so varying charges could apply for the same damage from one wall to the next. Please note that walls do not necessarily need to be repainted in order to apply the same apportionment of charges.

Why does it cost £54 to repaint a wall, paint does not cost that much?

Unfortunately, employing contractors to carry out repainting is much more expensive than buying a tin of paint and doing it yourselves. Contractors have overheads to cover and need to charge for their labour to do the work on top of the cost of the materials. The walls often need to be treated before repainting especially when blu-tack has been used as the greasy residue needs to be cleaned off properly before paint can be applied, otherwise it will just seep back through the paint again. This process adds to the amount of time our contractors have to spend repainting. We have sourced reliable and reasonably priced contractors to carry out the work and they have kept their prices the same for several years now despite the rise in the price of materials. These prices have also been accepted as reasonable by deposit dispute adjudicators.

Why have I been charged for a wall that already had marks on it?

Please refer to the explanation of how these charges are worked out above. The apportionment of charges between landlord and tenant should reflect the condition of the walls at the start of the tenancy so the fact that they were not freshly painted has been taken into account already in the amount that you have been charged.

Why couldn’t you clean the marks off the wall instead of painting it?

It is very difficult to remove marks through cleaning the walls and doing so can often cause more damage. Although some very minor marks can be removed by wiping the wall gently with a damp cloth, the majority will not clean off. Rubbing the wall too hard in an attempt to remove marks will cause damage to the paintwork which often looks worse than the original mark and will need repainting anyway.

Why doesn’t blu-tac and nails in the walls count as fair wear and tear?

Blu-tac and nails are classed as avoidable damage and so do not class as fair wear and tear. Fair wear and tear is light damage such as scuffs in communal stairwells which accumulate over the period of the tenancy. Fair wear and tear is calculated based on the length of the tenancy and the type of occupant.

We have never used blu tac in the property, why have we been charged for repainting?

The inventory clerk will have examined the property at the point of constructing the original inventory. They will at this point have highlighted any areas that already have blu-tac marks, scuffs, nails, etc. If the clerk has highlighted that a wall that was unmarked on the inventory, now has marks at the end of the tenancy then they will highlight it as new damage that needs to be remedied at the tenants cost.

Why don’t grease marks count as fair wear and tear? Shouldn’t the landlord have provided a headboard?

Grease marks are not classed as fair wear and tear as it is avoidable damage. The landlord is not obliged to provide headboards and it is the responsibility of the tenant to either ensure they are not marking the walls with grease or that they make good any grease marks prior to checkout by repainting the wall.

Am I able to see an invoice with the works carried out as proof?

Of course! If you wish to see an invoice of works then our finance team can provide this. In most instances, an invoice will be available. However if the landlord has decided to only charge an apportionment charge for damage, then works will not have been carried out and therefore no invoice will be available.

I spilled paint on the carpet/burnt the carpet, why am I being charged for this when the landlord hasn’t replaced the whole carpet?

It would be excessive for the landlord to replace a whole carpet due to a small number of burn marks. Therefore, every time a tenant contributed to the damage of a carpet the landlord should only charge an apportionment charge for that specific damage. Once the carpet is so badly damaged through numerous damages, over various tenancies, he will then pay for the replacement himself, having received various contributions over the years.

The lightbulb was working when I moved out but the photo shows it isn’t?

Lightbulbs can stop working at any time. Unfortunately, we do have instances where lightbulbs that were working one day, are not working the next day. The condition of the property is relayed at the official checkout, so any bulbs that are not working at this time will need to be replaced at the tenants cost, provided they were stated as working when the original inventory was constructed.

£6 to change a lightbulb seems a bit pricey, you can buy lightbulbs for less than that?

Like all contractor charges, there is an element of labour involved. Not only to fit the light bulb but to make the trip to buy the bulb needed. To avoid this cost for labour, it is advised that you always replace all non-working bulbs prior to your check-out.

How have the apportionment charges been calculated for things like cigarette burns?

Our finance team have been on various deposit courses run by My Deposits adjudicators so that they can fairly apportion cost depending on the damage caused. This includes cigarette burns, iron burns and marked furniture etc.

My mattress was cleaned and then replaced, surely the cleaning part was pointless if it was going to be replaced anyway?

We always look for the most economical option when remedying any dilapidations. As cleaning is cheaper than replacing a mattress, we will try this in the first instance. Unfortunately, sometimes stains won’t come out and the mattress may need to be replaced after it has been cleaned. If it is excessively stained and beyond cleaning, we will arrange for a replacement and not attempt to clean it.

We recommend at the start of tenancies that mattress protectors are used to avoid these issues.

Can I just source my own replacement now I have moved out and deliver it to the house?

Unfortunately not. You are allowed access to the property (either yourself or via a third-party) during the dates of your tenancy. After you have vacated the property, any access or works need to be arranged by the Landlord or Coapt.

Why am I being charged when the landlord has no intention of actually replacing the item?

If an item is listed in the inventory but missing from the check-out report, the landlord has every right to charge the cost towards replacing the item although they do not actually have to replace it, as it is an asset they have lost.

I’ve been charged for the locks to be changed, why?

If a minority of tenants return their keys at the end of their tenancy, we will normally need to change the locks to ensure the next tenants’ safety. Whilst we do understand that it is normal for tenants to lose their keys, we can only be sure that no third party has unauthorised access to the property if we change the lock.

There are several things that were there when we moved in but were not noted on our inventory and now we are being charged for them?

The inventories were checked and signed by yourselves to confirm that everything listed in them is correct. Unfortunately, if this is not the case, it will be chargeable to yourselves. If you have any queries, do let us know and we will be happy to discuss this with you.

Can we get our deposit sent back individually?

The tenancy agreements are joint and severally liable. This means the deposit is classed as one joint deposit. Although we allowed you to pay individually, we are unable to send individual portions of deposits back. Any communal damage is down to you as tenants to resolve and to allocate costs depending on who caused that damage. The full breakdown will be provided for you to discuss amongst yourselves and the full cost of repairs deducted from your joint deposit. The only exception to this is if only one tenant is moving out. Then of course, the one tenant will have their share of the deposit returned to them.

My housemate still owes me money for the bills, can you take this out of the deposit?

Unfortunately, we are not able to get involved in internal disputes such as issues with bills, nor are we able to deduct these from the deposit. We do suggest that tenants take our bills-included package to avoid any issues with bills at the end of the tenancy.

I have been given 48 hours to reply to my deposit breakdown, but I need longer to go through it with my housemates.

No problem! Just reply to let us know, we will then put this on hold until we hear from you and we’ll look after your deposit until the issue is resolved.

I have replied to the breakdown with some queries, how long should I expect to wait for a response from you?

Please do bear with us, this is an incredibly busy time. We have nearly 500 properties moving in and out in a very short space of time. The deposits are handled in order of move out date and we will respond to each of you. We aim to respond within 48 hours to each email, however please do bear with us, this could take longer depending on the number of queries you have.

My housemate has caused damage that has come to more than their share of the deposit, can I still get mine back in full?

The tenancy agreements are joint and severally liable. This means the deposit is one payment. We will send a breakdown of deductions on a room by room basis. If one tenants ‘share’ of damages is more than their portion of deposit, it will be up to yourselves as tenants to reclaim the money off them if you wish. All deductions will be made from the deposit as a whole.

You said to come back to you in 48 hours if I don’t agree with the deposit. It has been 48 hours and the money is not in my account yet?

We will give you 48 hours to initially respond to the breakdown. Please note, we will not return the deposit before this time period has passed. Once the 48 hours have passed, if we have not heard from you regarding this, we will return the deposit to you. Please contact us if the deposit is not in your account after this time period and we will rectify the issue as soon as we can.

Can I come back to you if I agree with the deposit deductions to speed it up a bit

Yes of course! If you are happy with the breakdown, please feel free to email us straight back to let us know and we can return this to you at the next available opportunity.

I want to go to court over my deposit, what do I do?

We always hope that we will be able to find a middle ground, where you are happy. However if you do not agree with the deductions you have the right to dispute your deposit through MyDeposits. MyDeposits do ask that you have attempted to resolve the disagreement (e.g. you have told us you are not happy and asked us to clarify anything) before taking it to dispute. Please note the dispute process is the first step and will be judged by an independent claims official. Small claims courts will direct you to MyDeposits dispute service in the first instance. If you would like to raise a dispute, you can do so on the MyDeposits website www.mydeposits.co.uk.

What happens on the day I move out?

Our independent inventory company will come to your property any time from 7am on the last day of your tenancy to conduct a check-out. Please make sure the property is returned to the same condition as the inventory and completely clean and clear of all personal belongings or rubbish, including outside areas, by 7am. No matter how useful you might think an item will be for the next tenant, it’s important to not leave it, otherwise you may be charged for its removal. We recommend moving out the day before to avoid any last minute stress.

What do I do with the keys when I move out?

All keys should be left together inside the property. Please do not hand-deliver or post keys back to our office, as this will mean they are not listed on the check-out report and you may be charged.

If your front door requires a key to lock when closed, please pop the rest of the keys inside, lock the front door and push the last set through the letterbox.

What do I do with my bills when I move out?

Prior to the last day of your tenancy, contact your gas, electricity and water suppliers to let them know you are moving out. On the last day take meter readings and provide them to supplier. (Tip: take photos of all the readings, they can come in handy!). If you have top-up meters for any utilities, you must ensure these have the same amount of credit as when you moved in. You can find this information on your inventory. Don’t forget about broadband / telephone providers, your TV license and to re-direct any post. We will not be able to collect any post for you once you have moved out.

How do I avoid deductions from my deposit?

The best way is to use your inventory and go around the house room by room making sure the property is returned to the same condition as when you moved in. Pay special attention to cleanliness, this is the most common deposit deduction. Don’t worry, we will of course allow for fair wear and tear.

Getting my deposit back

After the check out has been completed on the last day of your tenancy, we will have a breakdown of any deductions to you within one month at the latest, but we will aim for sooner. Once agreed, your deposit will be returned within 48 hours to your nominated bank account.

When will my deposit be returned?

After the check out has been completed on the last day of your tenancy, we will have a breakdown of any deductions to you within one month at the latest, but we will aim for sooner. Once agreed, your deposit will be returned within 48 hours to your nominated bank account.

How do I avoid deductions from my deposit?

The best way is to use your inventory and go around the house room by room making sure the property is returned to the same condition as when you moved in. Pay special attention to cleanliness, this is the most common deposit deduction. Don’t worry, we will of course allow for fair wear and tear.

What do I do with my bills when I move out?

Prior to the last day of your tenancy, contact your gas, electricity and water suppliers to let them know you are moving out. On the last day take meter readings and provide them to supplier. (Tip: take photos of all the readings, they can come in handy!). If you have top-up meters for any utilities, you must ensure these have the same amount of credit as when you moved in. You can find this information on your inventory. Don’t forget about broadband / telephone providers, your TV license and to re-direct any post. We will not be able to collect any post for you once you have moved out.

What do I do with the keys when I move out?

All keys should be left together inside the property. Please do not hand-deliver or post keys back to our office, as this will mean they are not listed on the check-out report and you may be charged.

If your front door requires a key to lock when closed, please pop the rest of the keys inside, lock the front door and push the last set through the letterbox.